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Thoracic Surgery Fellowship Program

The thoracic surgery residency program was established in 1955 by Dr. William H. Harry Muller. Our current thoracic surgery residency program director is Dr. Irving L. Kron, and the associate director is Dr. David R. Jones. The residency program at the University of Virginia is two (2) continuous years of clinical training in adult cardiac, general thoracic, and pediatric cardiac surgery. All of the cardiothoracic surgical training is based at the University of Virginia Medical Center. At the completion of clinical training, residents are eligible for certification by the American Board of Thoracic Surgery. All UVA Thoracic Surgery residents have passed their ABTS examinations and are fully board-certified.

The program spans the continuum of care from pre-operative assessment, plan and execution of operation; critical care management, post-operative recovery, and post surgical discharge follow up evaluation. Residents are exposed to a multitude of new and innovative treatments such as minimally-invasive adult cardiac surgery, off-pump coronary cases, VATS lobectomies and segmentectomies, advanced laparoscopy and thoracoscopy, aortic stent grafts, ventricular assist devices, and percutaneous valve technologies.

The primary focus and goal of our program is to produce cardiothoracic surgeons that are competitive for both premier academic and private practice jobs at the completion of their training. As the only thoracic surgery residency program in the Commonwealth, our residents are exposed to a high volume of complex cases which ensures a stellar operative and clinical experience. An emphasis of the program is on developing the academic thoracic surgeon who has superb technical skills and solid clinical judgment. Given the high volume of clinical care there is no time for any laboratory research, although clinical projects, papers, and presentations are strongly encouraged and supported.

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